Tag Archives: pastry

The Chocolate Queen

Put it in your diary: Kirsten Tibballs is coming to SBS Food! Her television show The Chocolate Queen is hitting Australian screens 6pm weeknights from Monday June 3rd on SBS Food!

With Kirsten’s favourite tips and tricks, you don’t need to be a professional to make showstopping creations in your own kitchen. According to Kirsten, chocolate is THE most versatile ingredient out there and she proves it with a range of quick and easy recipes. From levelling-up dessert classics like chocolate mousse, to making a quick chocolate rose garnish using only plastic wrap, you’ll be a master in no time.

Kirsten may be a leader in the chocolate industry but having been baking since she was a child with her mother and grandmother, and now passing those recipes onto her son, she has a soft spot for wholesome homemade treats. The Chocolate Queen brings you reliable crowd-pleasers and family favourites from a decadent brownie to a chocolate taco, and even a chocolate toastie.

All the recipes from the show are available on the SBS Food website, so you can add them to your repertoire and create them for your loved ones at home. They’re sure to impress and will have your family and friends hanging out for more.

So, tune in and join the Chocolate Queen herself for some simple, yet beautiful, homemade chocolate recipes – including a banana split like one you’ve never seen before!

Australian Milk Supply Runs Dry

As a pastry chef I am committed to supporting local producers and milk and cream are ingredients I use in my work every day, but not often enough do I stop to think about the consistency of supply and where it comes from. Australia’s dairy industry is entering an uncertain future as the drought blazes on, stalling growth in milk production.

The milk shortage started back in 2016 when Murray Goulburn, one of Australia’s biggest dairy co-ops, buying milk from farmers and selling it both nationally and internationally left a lot of dairy farmers high and dry. Withholding information about global milk prices dropping, Murray Goulbourn slapped large debts on farmers, causing many to leave the industry which has contributed to today’s shortage in production.

The Australian milk shortage has been a somewhat hot-topic in the media in the past few years, with supermarket giants like Coles and Woolworths reducing their home-brand retail prices to $1 and $1.10 a litre, but the issue runs deeper as the drought continues to blaze through rural Australia.

With weather conditions effecting feed quality and quantity, skyrocketing prices of feed and water, there’s no drought-relief in sight. With the drought expected to worsen in the foreseeable future, the Bureau of Meteorology recorded 2018 as Australia’s 39th-driest from the year 1900, the input costs are expected to rise for Australian farmers. As a result, Rabobank reported that we’ve seen a 15% increase of Australian dairy farmers sending their herd off to meat markets, causing a 12% reduction in the Australian milk pool in the last 12 months.

Milk supply has not only been affected in Australia but has stalled the world over. As one of the global Big 7 exporters — along with the US, EU, New Zealand, Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay — we’ve seen the combined milk-supply growth continue to slow. Unfortunately, this isn’t expected to improve all that much in the next year.

According to Dairy Australia, Australia exports around a third of its overall dairy production but farmers are looking to nurture long-term relationships with Australian companies. John Hayes, the National Sales Manager of Bulla Dairy Foods, says ‘Over the past 2 years, Bulla Family Dairy have committed to increasing their direct supply from partnerships with Australian farms, rather than relying on co-operatives, as part of their commitment to integrity and sustainability.’ One thing we don’t consider when we talk about milk is how we also need milk to create cream. The market is seeing such a shortage of milk that Bulla, a family owned company, is one of the few in the Australian market still producing cream which many of their competitors have had to stop producing, instead focussing on other products.

To develop my recipes, I endeavour to use the highest calibre ingredients and in sourcing my milk locally I can be sure of its quality. As a business owner, I understand the mutually beneficial relationship between consumer and supplier and will continue to keep it local and support our dairy industry as they support me.

by Kirsten Tibballs

5 minutes with Cedric Grolet

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Cedric Grolet is one of the most prominent figures on the French pastry scene and reflects a new generation of pastry chefs. Having excelled to the top of his game at the age of 31, Grolet is now the Head Pâtissier at the prestigious Le Meurice in Paris. As well as reinventing French pastry classics, the award winning chef is famed for his sculpted fruit creations and the Rubik’s Cube. Cedric Grolet recently taught three exclusive hands-on classes to a limited number of students at Savour School. We caught up with him and here’s what he had to say…

How did you get into patisserie?

At the age of 7 I was already in the kitchen. My grandparents owned a hotel in Andrézieux-Bouthéon just outside Lyon and my earliest memory is tasting the vanilla ice cream they made for me. It was from that moment that I knew I wanted to be a pastry chef.

What are your favourite flavours?

I love the most simple flavours. Simple is always best, even when I am reinventing the classics.

Do you have a favourite sculpted fruit?

La Noisette (hazelnut) is my signature sculpted fruit. Not only is it my personal favourite, it is also the best seller at Le Meurice.1Y1A8602-Edit-2

What was your inspiration behind the Rubik’s cube?

The idea was initiated during the quarterly Club des Sucrés. The concept of the Club des Sucrés was introduced by Christophe Adam and Christophe Michalak and occurs every 3 months in France. It brings together the finest and most famous pastry chefs who discuss emerging trends and new themes. I have childhood memories about travelling in the car during summer holidays and playing games to keep me entertained for the duration of the journey. It was then that we proposed the theme of the Rubik’s cube.

Was it the most technical pastry you have created?

I am continually testing myself and generating new ideas but the Rubik’s cube was undoubtedly the most technical creation to date. It took two full days to make but the final result was impeccable and worth all of the effort and work.

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

My best achievement to date is when I took the position of Head Pâtissier at Le Meurice.

Tell us about your new book.

My new book “Fruits” will be released on 21st September 2017. There are 100 recipes and 450 pages. Each page is shot on a background that’s deeply connected to nature such as marble and grass.

Baking Business: The MUST haves for any bakery or patisserie

Keeping up with new ingredients and technology can be challenging, especially when we spend a large amount of our time in the kitchen.

Advancements in technology means we have access to intelligent machinery which, if embraced, will change the way we work. Cooking, baking, rolling and freezing is made easy with modern technology now available across a broad range of machinery. This is giving us a more consistent product that can extend shelf life, save on labour and reduce overheads.

I have selected three products currently in the market that I believe would be valuable to any bakery/patisserie for their innovation and technology.

Panem Retarder Prover

Panem Retarder Prover

Firstly, for bakeries creating yeast based products, I am impressed with the Panem Retarder Prover Cabinet.

This retarder prover has a double wall design non-direct air flow circulation that eliminates product skinning and uneven proving, as well as a blocking system that prevents over proving.

All bread doughs including sweet fruit doughs, croissants and Danish pastries are effectively retarded and then gently proved to perfection.

The advantage of retarder provers is the ability to place the product into the prover up to 24 hours in advance, and program the unit to start proving so your products are ready as your bakers arrive for work. This offers more attractive working hours for your staff and a consistent quality of product.

Robot Cook by Robot Coupe

Robot Cook by Robot Coupe

Next on my list is the Robot Cook. Lots of kitchens have become familiar and work with the Thermomix, which was actually created for the domestic market. The Robot Cook is a commercial grade product that is more suited to a commercial kitchen. It has a 3.7 litre capacity where the Thermomix only holds 2.2 litres. The top temperature on the Thermomix is 100°C and the Robot Cook goes up to 140°C.

What does the Robot Cook do that would be advantageous to you and your business? It can emulsify, grind, mix, stir, chop, blend and knead, amongst the many other functions you can achieve in the one bowl. Part of the technology is an anti-vapour lid wiper that ensures perfect visibility during processing. It also still functions as a Blixer 3.

This is cutting edge technology that will save your business time and money, helping you create products such as custards, cake mixes, tempering chocolate, doughs, pie fillings, pastry and much more.

UNOX Baker Top MIND MAPS

UNOX Baker Top MIND MAPS

I can’t discuss technology without bringing to your attention the ultimate in oven technology: the UNOX Baker Top MIND MAPS. The first oven of its kind worldwide, it can be monitored remotely and be connected to the internet. You can program the oven to give you variable cooking temperatures and fan speeds while baking a product, which for products such as macarons and choux pastry is the ultimate in baking. The oven also has built in sensors so if you are baking a larger volume of a product you have baked previously, the oven will self-adjust its cooking times and temperatures for consistency.

This oven is the most complete display touch visual language that has ever been created for an oven. With the pen, you can draw your cooking processes and save them in the program. This UNOX oven also has pre-programmed bake times for a wide range of products already programmed into the oven. Normally a combi oven would not be considered for baked goods such as croissant, Danish and breads, but with this new technology the results speak for themselves with a more consistent baked product than what you can achieve in a deck oven.

This is just some of the great new technology available to pastry chefs and we’ll highlight more innovative equipment as they become available.

Check out more at TheGlassKnife.com.

Online Classes now available at Savour

Eclairs - Savour Online ClassesSavour Chocolate & Patisserie School has launched online classes, just in time for Christmas.

 

Sign up to Online Classes now to receive the following benefits:

 

– Access to a library of videos, with more added every month.

– Videos include recipes and techniques covering topics such as chocolate & pralines, desserts, pastry, entremets, petit gateaux, macarons, petit fours, tarts, tea cakes and more.

– Videos and recipes suited to all levels, from non-professional beginners through to advanced chefs.

– Downloadable recipes with detailed methods.

– Access to the forum where you can ask questions, make comments and connect with other passionate foodies and chefs around the world.

 

FIRST 300 SUBSCRIBERS
Receive the special price of $11.95 per month (normally $14.95) or only $99.00 for a full year (normally $145.00).

 

Treat yourself, your friends or your family to the ultimate Christmas gift!

 

Let’s get cooking!

Click here to view more information about our online classes