Tag Archives: culinary schools

Christmas with the Queen of Chocolate

Christmas Wreath from Cake Bake & Sweet Show Melbourne 2016

By Kirsten Tibballs at Savour
www.savourschool.com.au

 

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Makes 1 x mousse cake in the Silikomart Lady Queen mould

Equipment

  • Freezer
  • Microwave
  • Plastic bowl for the microwave
  • 5 x flat trays
  • Disposable piping bags
  • Scissors
  • Ladle
  • Small sieve
  • Assorted bowls
  • Stand Mixer x 1
  • Whisk attachment for mixer
  • Wire rack for glazing
  • Stone surface for chocolate work
  • Thermometer
  • Tweezers
  • Saucepans

Shortbread base

  • 150g      Unsalted butter
  • 250g      Plain Flour
  • 65g        Free Range Eggs
  • 100g      Icing Sugar
  • 25g        Almond Meal
  • Pinch of Salt
  • Plain flour for dusting

 

Combine the butter and flour in a bowl with a paddle attachment on a KitchenAid Mixer. Bring it to a crumb texture and add in the eggs and dry ingredients. Bring together as a dough and press into an even flat square. Place the shortbread in the fridge for up to an hour or until it becomes firm enough to roll out. Lightly dust the bench surface with flour and roll out the shortbread to a 3mm thickness. Cut a ring 50mm inside and 200mm outside. Bake 170°C for 10-12 minutes or until a light golden brown colour.

 

Raspberry Jelly

  • 22g        Gold Gelatine Sheets
  • 500g      Frozen Raspberry Puree, defrosted
  • 375g      Caster Sugar

 

Pre-soak the gelatine in cold water until soft and pliable. Place an additional 2 large frames on the prepared frames. Take one third of the defrosted raspberry puree and combine with the sugar. Heat until all the sugar is dissolved and then add in the pre-soaked gelatine. Remove from the heat and add the remaining defrosted puree and mix well. Place into a Silikomart Lady Queen insert mould and freeze.

 

Sugar coated almonds

  • 25g        Water
  • 35g        Caster Sugar
  • 125g      Almond Splinters
  • 10g        Pure Icing Sugar

 

Place the water and sugar into a saucepan and boil until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and pour the sugar syrup over the slithered almonds and combine. Place the coated almonds onto a tray lined with a Silpat mat and dust with the icing sugar.

Place the prepared almonds into the oven and bake at 170°c. for approximately 10-12 minutes. In short intervals turn over the almonds with a spatula to ensure even roasting. Cool the almonds at room temperature.

 

Festive Mousse

  • 60g        Caster Sugar
  • 30g        Water
  • 60g        Egg Yolks
  • 2             Heilala Vanilla beans
  • 3.5g       Gold Gelatine Leaves
  • 130g      Callebaut White Chocolate Velvet
  • 25g        Glaze cherries
  • 25g        Glace orange
  • 25g        Sugar coated almond*
  • 25g        Dark Chocolate Chips
  • 345g      Bulla Thickened Cream 35% fat, semi whipped

 

Boil the sugar and water to 123°C. Pour over the whisked egg yolks, add the glaze cherries and glace orange and continue to whisk until it cools slightly (to create a pate bombe). Soak the gelatine in cold water until soft and pliable. Once soft drain off the excess water and heat in the microwave for 30 seconds or until melted, do not heat above 80°C. Melt the white chocolate to approximately 60°C and fold through ¼ of the semi whipped cream. Continue folding and add the pate bombe. Add a small amount of this mixture to the melted gelatine and mix together before adding back into the mousse and folding through. Lastly fold through the remainder of the semi whipped cream and add the vanilla beans. Weigh in 150g per mould on top of the raspberry jelly, level it out and place in the freezer.

 

Assembly

Pipe the festive mousse halfway into a Silikomart Lady Queen mould. Push it up the sides of the mould with a spoon. Place in the frozen raspberry jelly and fill to the top of the mould with remaining mousse. Freeze for a minimum of 6 hours.

 

Chocolate Glaze

 

Ingredients

  • 240g      Fresh Cream 35% Fat
  • 50g        Water
  • 360g      Caster Sugar
  • 120g      Callebaut Cocoa Powder 22-24%
  • 100g      Neutral Glaze
  • 10g        Gold Gelatine Sheets

Method

Pre-soak the gelatine in a bowl of chilled water until it becomes soft and pliable. Drain off the excess water and leave the gelatine at room temperature. Bring the cream, water and sugar to boil. Add the cocoa powder and neutral glaze and return to a boil. Emulsify with a stick blender, add the pre-soaked gelatine and strain. Place plastic wrap on the surface of the glaze. Allow the glaze to cool to between 32-35°C before glazing the frozen mousse.

Finishing

  • Chocolate holly leafs
  • Chocolate pinecones
  • Chocolate reindeers
  • Gold Metallic powder
  • 24 carat gold leaf
  • Chocolate bells
  • Red chocolate ribbon loops

 

Garnish the wreath with prepared chocolate garnishes and dust with gold metallic.

 

 

Jordi Bordas joins Savour Online Classes

World Champion Jordi Bordas joins Savour Online Classes as a guest chef to give you the recipes and show you the techniques for replicating two of his amazing creations.

In 2011, Jordi won the Coupe de Monde in Lyon (with Julien Alvarez). He has his own school in Barcelona and has developed B·Concept – taking classic recipes and making them healthier, whilst maintaining flavour and texture.

The two products Jordi will teaching you with Savour Online Classes to create is:

TROPICAL ENTREMET

A delicious gluten free and lactose free entremet with the main flavours being coconut and passionfruit.

MANDARINA PETIT GATEAUX

Learn how to create the Mandarina Petit Gateaux as seen on MasterChef España. The contestants on Masterchef were only given 2 hours to complete the task, fortunately you have all the time in the world!

Jordi Bordas will be teaching classes at his school in English from 2017. You can follow Jordi on Instagram.

 

Copyright on Products: Where do we draw the line?

Pipa

Pipa is a creation by Paul Kennedy at Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School

With the increased ability of reaching our target audience via social media, businesses, bakers and chefs have ongoing pressure to continually post exceptional images. Not many chefs or businesses are in the position to either pay for a professional photographer or have the variety of product to enable them to post regularly. This has led to some individuals posting images of other people’s product without prior consent or acknowledgment of the original creator.

I also come across regular contention on social media from chefs recreating other people’s product and not acknowledging the original designer. If you are re-creating someone else’s product should they get a mention? At what point is it no longer their idea and concept, or is this just the greatest form of flattery even if they don’t get the recognition. For example a pastry chef at some point created the éclair, croissant, macaron, lamington etc…

There are copyright laws pertaining to work created. Social media sites also have their own guidelines on copyright.

What is copyright? A work of authorship includes literary, written, dramatic, artistic, musical and other certain types of works which can include cakes, baked goods, desserts etc… Copyright exists as soon as the product is created and it applies to published and non-published works. As soon as you put down your palette knife, click the shutter on your camera, or hit the home button on your smart phone you have got a copyright (with some exceptions). Copyright also covers photography and that means that in relation to an artistic work, copying includes the making of a copy of a photograph in two dimensions or a three-dimensional work. This is a grey area as to what qualifies as artistic work. So if you see an image of a product it may be protected by copyright which should stop you recreating it.
Copyright is automatic and does not require you to file any paper work as is the case for trademarks and patents.

Having a copyright enables you exclusively to
1. Reproduce the copyrighted work
2. Display the copyrighted work publicly
3. Prepare derivative works based on the copyrighted work
4. Distribute copies of copyrighted work to the public by sale, rental and or display the image.

There is an exception called Fair Use, this allows the public to use portions of copyrighted work without permission from the owner.

Copyright of food products is much more prevalent in countries such as USA who are renowned for their litigation. A good example of this is Dominique Ansel’s Cronut.

Cronut

Dominique Ansel’s ‘Cronut’ creation

United States Patent and Trademark Office records reveal that “Cronut” is now a registered trademark. Dominique Ansel filed the paperwork for the croissant-doughnut hybrid shortly after its public debut in May 2013, but the trademark was not registered until 2014.
After Dominique announced his trademark plans for the Cronut last year, his decision was met with some hostility from other businesses. At the time, the bakery took to Facebook to explain the decision.

The post read, in part:
“Our desire to protect the name is not an attempt to claim or take credit for all cooking methods associated with the recipe or all croissant and doughnut products in general. Instead it offers bakery and chef protection against un-granted affiliations with the bakery or confusion with customers”.

I think if you are using someone else’s image you should always request consent before you proceed, if you replicate a product that you have seen as an image of you should credit the original creator. Always be inspired by others work and when creating your own productions do it in your own style. If people replicate or copy your work it forces you to create a new concept or product and keep evolving as a professional.

Yoon Kim, From Bean to Bar…to World | Savour Spotlight

Yoon-KimThis week we sat down with chocolatier, Yoon Kim, a regular student at Savour School and now successful business owner, to learn more about her exciting chocolate journey.

What is your name and current occupation?
Yoon Kim. Commercial chef.

What is the name of your company and what does your company produce?
The Smooth Chocolator. We produce bean to bar chocolate made from fairly and directly traded cocoa beans.

What prompted you to begin chocolate making? What was it that motivated you to develop these skills?
I was always interested in pastry so I took some classes at Savour School. Soon I found there is a lot to learn in chocolate making. The more I do, the more there is to learn which I found fascinating. Bean to bar chocolate was new to me, but the flavours of different cocoa beans made me want to pursue that path with no hesitation.

What classes have you completed at Savour? Which class is your favourite to date?
I’ve done Entremets/Gateaux,  Entremets/ Gateaux Continuing Education, Petit Gateaux, Eclairs, Chocolates & Pralines Level 1, 2, 3, 4 and Bean to Bar. My favourite is Chocolates & Pralines Level 3.

How have these classes helped you to achieve your career goals?
First of all, I knew nothing about chocolates before I took the classes. I just wanted to learn how to temper the chocolates. But as I was taking more classes at a higher level, I learnt the technical side of making chocolate, such as understanding crystals in couverture and troubleshooting as well as the aesthetic side of the products. I feel very lucky to live close to Savour School as I can always go back and seek further learning.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?
I’ve only started to make and sell bean to bar chocolate but I have recently signed an exclusive contract with 2 Beans in New York and my entire range is going to be sold at 2 Beans New York which is exciting.

What’s the best advice you have been Smooth-Chocolator---Yoon-Kim1given in relation to your chocolate career, and who was the advice from?
“Be passionate and try something new all the time”. The advice was from Jean-Marie Auboine, one of the guest chefs at Savour School.

What’s next for you and your company?
Getting a bigger quantity of good quality cocoa beans and of course trying to get the best out of the beans by finding the right processes. I’m planning to approach more chocolate shops in the US, UK, Hong Kong as well as Australia once I have the secured supply of cocoa beans.

Smooth-Chocolator---Yoon-KimWhat is your favourite chocolate to make?
Although I’m focussed on bean to bar chocolate bars only, coloured, moulded bonbons with fruit jelly and creamy ganache are my favourite chocolates to make.

For more information on Yoon’s Bean to Bar chocolates visit her website
For more information on classes visit Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School

Chocolate Showpieces: The Pinnacle of Food Art

What is a show piece? What makes pastry chefs and professionals strive to perfect these creative structures that flout gravity. I often ask myself why show pieces? They are impossible to sell due to the high labour content, they often don’t last long due to the fragile nature of the ingredients, and they take hours sometimes weeks of painstaking work to form.

Chocolate Showpiece by Paul KennedyNew Chocolate Showpiece by Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School Paul KennedyI do know why the increasingly popular constructions are made. What better way to showcase your skills on a grand scale. You must be able to create a showpiece to enter most international competitions. We as professionals are now often judged as a tradespeople by the strength of our show piece making skills. The top of their game Stephane Treand, Stephane Leroux, Frank Haasnoot and Stephane Klein are closely monitored by professionals around the world for the next trend or fashion in show pieces.

Show pieces are usually created by one of three mediums, chocolate, sugar and pastillage very few pastry chefs specialize in all three areas. The main one we lack skill and expertise in Australia is sugar but we certainly shine through with chocolate with Australia hosting some of the best in the world arguably Paul Kennedy is one of the leaders in Australia.

Chocolate Showpiece

Chocolate Showpiece from World Chocolate Masters

Paul was a finalist at the World Chocolate Masters in Paris and is Executive Pastry Chef at Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School. ‘Styles are constantly being re-invented with a new twist’ explains Paul. ‘Like fashion and everything in food, the styles of show pieces changes rapidly.’

The first step in starting the journey on a new show piece is understanding the medium you are working with for example the ability to temper chocolate. Next is the design, to start with it is easier to copy a simple show piece you have seen and liked. Draw the piece in pencil first ensuring the design flows and is not too static so the piece looks like it is moving. Cardboard is an easy medium to use to create your structure for chocolate. A lot of professionals will make a mock up of the show piece in cardboard before creating it with expensive ingredients. With our climate in Australia any type of sugar structure will deteriorate quickly, chocolate with the correct temperature controls can last for years.

One of the most important points when creating a show piece is to keep the piece clean and neat. Also try to emulate air and lightness by creating negative space in the piece so it is not too heavy. If you are recreating a life like item make it as close as possible to the natural equivalent. For example a flower should reflect a native flower but on a larger scale. Your structure should be solid to support all your decorations on the piece, but once the show piece is finished your structure should be almost invisible and just supporting your decorations.

Frank Haasnoot Chocolate Showpiece

Frank Haasnoot Chocolate Showpiece from 2011 World Chocolate Master

Chocolate show pieces date back over 70 years in history which started out as piped chocolate filigree assembled into three dimensional centre pieces followed by carved sculptures from a solid block of chocolate.  Then we moved onto modelling chocolate figures, modelling chocolate created from glucose and chocolate. With the invention of chocolate cool spray chocolate show pieces improved in leaps and bounds. Chocolate cool spray is compressed cold air in a aerosol that will instantly set chocolate, which means you no longer have to stand there holding a piece in place waiting for the chocolate to set. We now see incredible architecturally designed pieces that are getting more sophisticated each year.

Savour has just launched the newest chocolate showpiece creation for students to create in class. The western themed showpiece featuring various skulls, intricate flowers and life-like barbed wired.