Tag Archives: bean to bar

Yoon Kim, From Bean to Bar…to World | Savour Spotlight

Yoon-KimThis week we sat down with chocolatier, Yoon Kim, a regular student at Savour School and now successful business owner, to learn more about her exciting chocolate journey.

What is your name and current occupation?
Yoon Kim. Commercial chef.

What is the name of your company and what does your company produce?
The Smooth Chocolator. We produce bean to bar chocolate made from fairly and directly traded cocoa beans.

What prompted you to begin chocolate making? What was it that motivated you to develop these skills?
I was always interested in pastry so I took some classes at Savour School. Soon I found there is a lot to learn in chocolate making. The more I do, the more there is to learn which I found fascinating. Bean to bar chocolate was new to me, but the flavours of different cocoa beans made me want to pursue that path with no hesitation.

What classes have you completed at Savour? Which class is your favourite to date?
I’ve done Entremets/Gateaux,  Entremets/ Gateaux Continuing Education, Petit Gateaux, Eclairs, Chocolates & Pralines Level 1, 2, 3, 4 and Bean to Bar. My favourite is Chocolates & Pralines Level 3.

How have these classes helped you to achieve your career goals?
First of all, I knew nothing about chocolates before I took the classes. I just wanted to learn how to temper the chocolates. But as I was taking more classes at a higher level, I learnt the technical side of making chocolate, such as understanding crystals in couverture and troubleshooting as well as the aesthetic side of the products. I feel very lucky to live close to Savour School as I can always go back and seek further learning.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?
I’ve only started to make and sell bean to bar chocolate but I have recently signed an exclusive contract with 2 Beans in New York and my entire range is going to be sold at 2 Beans New York which is exciting.

What’s the best advice you have been Smooth-Chocolator---Yoon-Kim1given in relation to your chocolate career, and who was the advice from?
“Be passionate and try something new all the time”. The advice was from Jean-Marie Auboine, one of the guest chefs at Savour School.

What’s next for you and your company?
Getting a bigger quantity of good quality cocoa beans and of course trying to get the best out of the beans by finding the right processes. I’m planning to approach more chocolate shops in the US, UK, Hong Kong as well as Australia once I have the secured supply of cocoa beans.

Smooth-Chocolator---Yoon-KimWhat is your favourite chocolate to make?
Although I’m focussed on bean to bar chocolate bars only, coloured, moulded bonbons with fruit jelly and creamy ganache are my favourite chocolates to make.

For more information on Yoon’s Bean to Bar chocolates visit her website
For more information on classes visit Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School

New Chocolate Bar Wrappers for Bean to Bar Class

Bean to Bar - Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School

Now days, people are becoming increasingly concerned about where their food is sourced and the processes it undergoes prior to consumption, which is why our Bean to Bar classes at Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School are so popular.

By creating your own chocolate bars, you will be able to fully control the process, the flavours and additives, to create your own unique couverture from beans sourced from around the world.

Bean to Bar Chocolate Wrappers

Beautiful Chocolate wrapper by UNELEFANTE

Today, many chocolate artisans are creating their own original bars products for retail. But how does one stand out from the pack? Great chocolate of course. But that wrapper is important too.

Yes. That piece of paper or cardboard that shields the deliciousness inside.

With that in mind we decided to create some unique and hopefully attractive looking chocolate bar wrappers for our bean to bar class for students to take their creations home in.

The new Bean to Bar wrappers at Savour uses pictures, customs, symbols. flags and the coat of arms to easily represent the country of origin for which cocoa bean has used and the chocolate bar created. Even Savour is represented with our very own blended cocoa bean creation called ‘Brunswick Blend’.

Bean to Bar at Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School

Bean to Bar chocolate wrappers for students to take home their chocolates at Savour

For more information on our Bean to Bar class including dates and prices see the Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School class section.

Kirsten Tibballs and the Cocoa Tour of Ghana

I always knew Australia was the lucky country and my recent trip on a cocoa tour of Ghana proves it.

 

I was one of 45 blessed industry professionals to be invited on a 6 day tour of Ghana and more importantly the cocoa plantations. Through competitions and awards, F.Mayer Imports invited fortunate Cacao Barry and Callebaut customers to immerse themselves in the world of chocolate from the ground up.

 

Cocoa has sustained Ghana since Tetteh Quarshie, who first brought it from Fernando Po in Equatorial Guinea at around 1879. Cocoa secured Ghana’s future after it became an independent nation in 1957, by providing the bulk of the funds needed for its development.

 

The cultivation of cocoa still provides a living for millions in rural areas of Ghana, including those employed in the provision of ancillary services that support the industry, such as warehousing and the transport sector.

 

Ghana provides 24% of the world’s supply of cocoa, the second biggest supplier in the world after Ivory Coast, and is supplied by thousands of individual farms. Ghana grew over a million tons of cocoa in the last financial year. The average number a cocoa beans grown and processed per acre per year for a farm in Ghana is 350-400kg of beans. The cocoa price is set by the Ghana cocoa board in conjunction with the government each year, and is reviewed accordingly. The current pricing will give a farmer $106 US dollars per 64kg sack of beans.DSC_1613

 

Cocoa is the second most labour intensive agricultural product after vanilla. It takes 5 to 8 months for a cocoa pod to grow from the pollinated flower to a ripe cocoa pod. On cultivated cocoa plantations, only 3 out of 1000 flowers are pollinated, fertilized and grow into fruit. Wild cocoa has a much higher rate of 15 out of 1000 flowers producing fruit. Pods grow directly off the trunk or heavy branches of the tree. The pods are green while maturing and turns yellow, orange, red and purple when ripe. Ghana has created its own hybrid of cocoa, a combination of the robust Forastero and trinitario, which they have found is best suited to the environment, pests and diseases in Ghana.

 

The pod itself has between 30 – 50 individual cocoa beans inside, dependant on the size of the pod. The beans are removed from the pod and fermented in either wooden crates or wrapped in banana leaves for up to seven days. This will break down the fruit membrane on the outside of the bean and develop the flavour. The beans are then dried naturally in the sun in a thin layer and raked over at regular intervals to ensure they dry evenly and separate any joined beans. Once dried the beans can only hold a maximum of 7.5% moisture before being packaged. 1kg of dried cocoa beans produces 800g of couverture with 80% cocoa.

 

IMG_2618Our tour was an amazing opportunity for skilled professionals to gain an insight into the culture and cocoa industry of Ghana. I now have a true appreciation of the labour and love involved in producing Callebaut and Cacao Barry couverture from the ground up. Cocoa is a fragile commodity impacted by so many outside influences; I like to think I give chocolate the affection it deserves.

 

A big thank you to Gary Willis who organised the whole trip, F. Mayer Imports and Callebaut and Cacao Barry chocolate.

 

At the end of this year, Kirsten will be launching brand new ‘bean to bar’ chocolate classes. These ongoing classes are exclusive to Savour Chocolate and Patisserie School.